Archive | March 2016

BRIAN GERRISH Child Stealing By The State:

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    Refuse falsify records to take ordered babies expect bullied police mental units – Carol Woods exposes Child Stealing by State Brave lady RT
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    news live 1pm today interview SS whistleblower Carol Woods- bullied arrested more 4 refusing 2 assist child stealing

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VICE


Defense & Security

Canadian Judge Orders VICE News Journalist to Hand Over Digital Messages

March 31, 2016 | 1:00 pm

An Ontario court has ruled that a VICE News reporter must hand
over all communications between him and an Islamic State fighter to
Canada’s federal police force.
Last month, VICE Media fought the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police’s (RCMP) court-granted production order
for national security reporter Ben Makuch’s Kik instant messenger app chat logs, or screen shots of the chats, between him and Farah Shirdon.
The
22-year-old Calgary man allegedly left Canada in 2014 to fight
alongside IS in Iraq and Syria. He was charged in absentia with six
terrorism-related offences last September, after he was interviewed by
Makuch and VICE CEO Shane Smith. He’s still at large and the RCMP has
issued a red notice through INTERPOL asking for his capture and return
back to Canada.
The RCMP argued they needed Makuch’s communications with Shirdon as evidence to prove their charges.
VICE
fought the production order in court, arguing that police seizure of
any journalist’s records would violate press freedoms and set a
dangerous precedent for journalism in Canada.

VICE
also argued that Makuch’s records would not provide the police with
anything they didn’t already know and that the production order was
merely a fishing expedition by the RCMP.
But in a decision
released this week, the court rejected VICE’s attempt to quash the
order, ruling that the police’s ability to gather evidence trumps the
rights of VICE and Makuch to protect their work product in this case.
Specifically, the screen captures of the chats are “important evidence
in relation to very serious allegations” and “The screen captures are a
copy of the actual electronic messages that Shirdon placed on Mr.
Makuch’s computer screen. They are highly reliable evidence that do not
require a second hand interpretation,” Justice Ian MacDonell wrote in
his decision.
VICE is reviewing the judgment and giving serious consideration to appealing the decision.
Patrick
McGuire, head of content for VICE Canada, said he doesn’t agree with
the judge’s assertion that VICE is withholding any “highly reliable
evidence.”
“Our reporting has allowed the RCMP to charge Shirdon
in absentia. We are not protecting Shirdon’s identity or whereabouts,
and we believe we have published all relevant material that is within
the public interest,” McGuire said. “VICE News, and every other Canadian
journalistic organization, must be permitted to operate as an entity
that is independent from law enforcement.”
VICE’s lawyer, Iain
MacKinnon, said similar production orders could become more common in
Canada if police know they can easily obtain notes and recordings from
journalists. “It could have a very real chilling effect on the
willingness of people and witnesses speaking to journalists,” said
MacKinnon. “If people realize that what they say to a journalist could
easily be handed over to police and used as part of a criminal
investigation, that may scare somebody off in speaking to a journalist.
That is a very real concern that, unfortunately, the judge did not
address in his reasons, even though it was raised as a factor he should
consider.”

It’s
very rare for law enforcement agencies to demand records from
journalists in Canada, and Tom Henheffer, executive director of the
Canadian Journalists for Free Expression, said the court’s decision
signals a concerning turning point for journalistic integrity.
“This
is an extremely unfortunate decision and obviously a huge blow for
press freedom in Canada. Journalists are not a law enforcement arm for
the government and to be treated as such by the judiciary is a massive
mistake,” Henheffer said in an interview.
“If journalists are an
armslength office of some enforcement agency, that’s going to hurt their
ability to get information from these groups, whether they be
terrorists or anyone else. It’s important that those stories are told to
the Canadian people because we need to understand what makes these guys
tick and the best way to do that is by having journalists talk to
them.”
Henheffer says he hopes the case will be turned over on
appeal. “If it isn’t, then there has to be pressure put on legislators
to ensure that something is in place to protect journalistic sources,”
he said.
Follow Rachel Browne on Twitter: @rp_browne

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CATHY FOX Voicing CSA – Nottingham meeting videos

Voicing CSA – Nottingham meeting videos

The most important action we can take to help ourselves and each
other and to make our voice effectively heard, is to link up with other
survivors into groups as Voicing CSA helps to do.

Please note that victims of abuse may be triggered by reading this information. These links are generally UK based.

  • The Sanctuary for the Abused [A] has advice on how to prevent triggers.
  • National Association for People Abused in Childhood [B] has a freephone helpline and has links to local support groups.
  • Other useful sites are One in Four [C]
  • and Havoca [D].
  • Useful post on Triggers [E]  from SurvivorsJustice [F]blog.
  • Jim Hoppers pages on Mindfulness [G]  and Meditation [H] may be useful.
  • Hwaairfan blog An Indigenous Australian Approach to Healing Trauma  [J]
  • Survivors UK for victims and survivors of male rape or the sexual abuse of men [K]

Voicing CSA held a meeting in Nottingham with the Nottingham CSA
team. This post is all available on their website, Voicing CSA
Nottingham – emotive and compassionate [1]

On the 19th of March 2016 Voicing CSA held a survivor meeting at the New Basford Community Centre in Nottingham.

Phil Lafferty – Voicing CSA

It was rewarding that the meeting was full. Standing room only at
times. Although a reminder of how much work there is to do around
survivor to survivor support and the need to continue to raise awareness
around childhood sexual abuse and childhood sexual exploitation.

It was especially rewarding that a number of people attended who felt
able to face and address their experiences for the first time.

The meeting, as ever, was very fluid and interactive. A very inclusive environment into which everyone was welcomed.

There were ten main speakers, including our directors, Phil Lafferty
and Nigel Thompson. Also the peerless Nigel O’Mara, Mandy Coupland,
Mickey Summers, Annamarie Cope, Sheila Norton, Kaz Gray, Josephine
Armatrading and a statement from Joan Cameron-Blair read by her sister
Josie Bemrose. You can watch and hear what they had to say below.

Mandy Coupland

Micky Summers

Sheila Norton

Nigel O’Mara

All of the above videos are also available by visiting our video album for the meeting. Videos of more speakers will be added in the coming days, and this news item will updated accordingly.

We would like to thank them for their contributions. It was fantastic
to hear the great work they are doing locally, regionally and
nationally to help survivors and to raise awareness around these issues.

The education and awareness campaigns that support groups are running
for GPs was a particular focus, in which the signs of abuse and
exploitation are explained, both in adult survivors and children.

Improving awareness and training in Medical Schools is something we
would like to see; and hope something that the IICSA (Goddard Inquiry)
will ultimately recommend.

After the main speeches, several people asked if they could address
the meeting, which of course they were able to do. We would like to
thank them for their courage and strength.

We would like to thank also, the generosity of the Nottingham
community for their much appreciated donation of £73.83 raised by
contributions to the lunch buffet costs for Voicing CSA. It was
unexpected and a testament to the sincerity of their support.

As ever, an emotionally charged day, but from which many people have benefited.

Next meeting – Sat 14 May 2016 Voicing CSA – Manchester  11:00 – 16:00Altrincham Town Hall

This was not part of the meeting but as the news came through
today of the first success of the Nottingham group I have added it. Well
done all cfb

Please note that victims of abuse may be triggered by reading this information. These links are generally UK based.

  • The Sanctuary for the Abused [A] has advice on how to prevent triggers.
  • National Association for People Abused in Childhood [B] has a freephone helpline and has links to local support groups.
  • Other useful sites are One in Four [C]
  • and Havoca [D].
  • Useful post on Triggers [E]  from SurvivorsJustice [F]blog.
  • Jim Hoppers pages on Mindfulness [G]  and Meditation [H] may be useful.
  • Hwaairfan blog An Indigenous Australian Approach to Healing Trauma  [J]
  • Survivors UK for victims and survivors of male rape or the sexual abuse of men [K]

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From Kincora to PIE:


Tuesday, 05 August 2014 20:03

From Kincora to PIE: Why the abuse inquiry needs access to intelligence documents


By

There
is growing momentum for the the Child Sex Abuse Inquiry to look at
Northern Ireland’s Kincora scandal, but a key piece of evidence linking
Kincora and the Paedophile Information Exchange suggests that access to
intelligence documents will be crucial to any new investigation.
Last month
former army officer Colin Wallace told Spinwatch of his willingness to
testify to the Child Sex Abuse Inquiry about historical abuse at the
Kincora Boys’ Home in Belfast during the 1970s. Our report also highlighted allegations by other un-named army officers, one of whom, Brian Gemmell, has since come forward publicly.
Amnesty International’s call for the abuse inquiry to look at Kincora has received widespread support in recent weeks.  A victim of abuse at home, Clint Massey, has waived his right to anonymity in order to speak out.
The
issue’s significance was underlined when it emerged that former
attorney-general Michael Havers had acted to limit the scope of a
previous investigation of Kincora in 1984. The revelation by Exaro News was swiftly followed by the resignation of Havers’ sister, Baroness Elizabeth-Sloss, as chair of the inquiry.
The judge
in that earlier investigation, William Hughes, said in his final report
that, ‘The conduct of the police, or elected representatives, or
clergymen, or military intelligence, or any other persons, who may have
been in receipt of allegations, information or rumours relating to
Kincora, or any other home, was not under scrutiny in this inquiry.’
British
military intelligence in Northern Ireland produced a number of documents
about Kincora, which formed the basis of Colin Wallace’s attempts to
persuade journalists to take up the story in the mid-1970s. A number of
these documents were later published by Paul Foot as appendices to his
book, Who Framed Colin Wallace?
They
included a briefing provided by Army intelligence to the Information
Policy unit at HQ Northern Ireland in 1973. It described a shadowy
loyalist paramilitary group known as Tara and its leader:

The OC is William MCGRATH. He is a known homosexual who has conned
many people into membership by threatening them with revealing
homosexual activities which he himself initiated. He is a prominent
figure in Unionist Party politics and in the Orange Order.

McGrath uses a non-existent evangelical mission as a front for his
homosexual activities and also runs a home for children on the (236)
Upper Newtonards Road, Belfast (Tel: B’fast 657838).

On the 8
November 1974, Colin Wallace wrote a memo highlighting the abuse of
inmates at this hostel, the Kincora Boys’ Home. His conclusion, cited in
Paul Foot’s book, was that the Army should seek to have matter
investigated by the RUC and by responsible journalists, something that
ultimately did not happen for another six years.
The
earlier 1973 memo on Tara made no direct mention of child abuse, but it
did include one largely un-noticed detail that may link Kincora to
parallel scandals in Britain.
A handwritten annotation at the bottom of the document reads:

‘Ulster’s children of conflict’, New Society 15 April 1971. Dr M. Fraser? RVH 

This is a
reference to Dr Morris Fraser, a child psychologist at the Royal
Victoria Hospital in Belfast, who wrote extensively about the impact of the Troubles on children. But what possible significance could he have in relation to Tara?
In May 1973, Fraser was charged with sexual offences against
boys in the United States. If this prompted Army Intelligence to make a
speculative link to Tara, it would tend to strengthen the case that the
Army was aware of child abuse at Kincora.
If
Fraser’s link to Kincora/Tara were proven, it would imply a direct link
between Kincora and the Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE) founded in
1974, of which Fraser was a member.
This is a particularly troubling possibility given that the allegations
surrounding both PIE and Kincora include claims that perpetrators were protected for intelligence purposes.
At a
minimum, the Wallace documents provide powerful evidence that some in
authority were aware of abuse at Kincora some six years before any
action was taken to put an end to it.
When those
documents first emerged in the 1980s, there were suggestions that they
were forgeries. As Paul Foot noted at the time, the best evidence for
their authenticity was the shifty reaction of the British Government,
who should have been in a position to debunk any such fabrication.
In 1989,
Labour’s Kevin McNamara, wrote to Northern Ireland Secretary Peter
Brooke, noting that Foot had received an opinion from forensic expert
Robert Radley supporting the authenticity of Wallace’s memo of 8
November 1974. In response, Brooke claimed that the document was of
limited value without further testimony from Wallace to the Hughes
Inquiry.
He thus
glossed over the fact that Hughes had no remit to examine what the Army
and intelligence agencies knew about Kincora, and that it was unable to
offer Wallace legal immunity in relation to his testimony on that
central issue.
Paul Foot wrote of this response in 1990:

Mr Brooke’s reaction, even when approached by the Labour front bench,
was to ignore the point at issue altogether; to make no inquiry into
the authenticity of the document or the accuracy of Mr Radley’s report,
but to fall back on the lame excuse that Colin did not give evidence to
the Hughes Inquiry. The Hughes Inquiry, as has been made clear here
again and again, could not investigate security or intelligence matters;
and therefore could not even ask the question whether or not the Army
and intelligence knew about Kincora, let alone answer it. There is about
Brooke’s replies in this correspondence as strong a stench of cover-up
in high places as there is from any other corner of this dark and dismal
story.

A quarter
of a century later, Foot’s suspicions have been vindicated. It now
appears that the narrow mandate of the Hughes Inquiry had been drawn up
by Sir Michael Havers after Cabinet-level discussions rejected a full
public inquiry into Kincora.
It is vital that the new Child Sex Abuse Inquiry does not repeat Hughes’ failure. As Amnesty’s Patrick Corrigan has said:
For this new inquiry to have credibility, the government must do things differently.The
entire purpose of the inquiry is to lift the lid on this grim chapter –
there should be no barriers to people saying what they know.
These
are deeply disturbing claims – that MI5 turned a blind eye to child
abuse and actively blocked a police investigation, instead using the
paedophile ring for its own intelligence-gathering purposes.
The
Home Secretary must announce the inclusion of Kincora in the inquiry
and an exemption so that army officers and others bound by the Official
Secrets Act can finally speak freely. 
The focus must be the protection of children, rather than officials and their dirty secrets.

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